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Old 03-20-2015, 12:36 AM   #1
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Default DIRK BENEDICT: TV's Reluctant Sex Symbol

"DIRK BENEDICT: TV's Reluctant Sex Symbol"

by Sue Russell

Playgirl Magazine, August 1984


The romantic hero on The A-Team claims Hollywood today is all microwave
stars--"Bang! Bang! Voom!"--and fast-food sex.

On the Face of it, Dirk Benedict seems an ideal candidate for this year's
spotlighted sex symbol: 5 feet, 11 inches, bronzed, blond, blue-eyes, and
the resident womanizer on a top TV series, The A-Team. It's perfect
placement for a touch of the Tom Selleck two-step--drumroll, please.
Yet so far, 39-year-old Benedict has turned away from the big,
bright splash and the wide wash of publicity that could make him
a poster-king heartthrob.

Right off the bat it's evident that there's something slightly off-center
about this reluctant TV hero. Oh, the Porsche is there, the expensive
gear, and the big, fat cigars. But retiring to his location trailer between
A-Team takes, Dirk Benedict gives the distinct impression that if the
entire TV business slipped into the Pacific one night he'd simply walk off
into the sunset without a backward glance.

He admits he feels trapped in a series, and readily confesses that the good
things that have come his way have happened almost in spite of
himself. He claims he had always had an "I don't need this" attitude,
and that it hasn't endeared him to the powers that be. A top
network executive once told him to cool it with the cigars and
to try to look a little hungrier. Even so, the fame is spiraling.

"We always get what we deserve," Benedict shrugs. "I'm not
avoiding being as popular as Tom Selleck, although it's probably
true that most actors in my situation would go for the brass ring
and say: 'My God! I'm on the hottest show! I'm the romantic lead!'
But it's not in me. It just doesn't matter to me."

In fact, as soon as an A-Team episode is safely in the can, Benedict (who
plays Templeton "The Face" Peck) usually flies off free as a bird, piloting
his single-engine Cessna to his Montana hideout. It's a modest, 20-acre
lakeside ranch nestled just eight miles from his newly built hangar.

Yet Benedict isn't someone who just fell into acting. His credentials are
classy. After graduating from Whitman College in Washington with a fine
arts degree in music (he plays piano and trombone, and also sings), he
decided to study in Rochester, Michigan, with John Fernald, the
former head of London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts who
had nurtured such illustrious talents as Albert Finney, Tom Courtenay
and Peter O'Toole. With two years of classical training, Benedict
began to appear in repertory theater and Broadway productions.

Considering that background, you'd think it might stick in his throat a
bit--all the no-talent, no-training bodies beautiful who flock to Hollywood
with their sole aim to get rich and famous fast.

"No, if you come to Hollywood to be a star, that's the right goal," he
corrects. "If you come here to be an actor, you're an idiot. Nobody cares!
You're not supposed to be an actor. Come on! Let's be honest!

"All you gotta do is get a TV series and you've got covers plastered
everywhere. Look at all the little girls who come to this town, 22 years
old, and look good in a bikini. They do a TV series--bang--they're on all
the covers. They're on there before Laurence Olivier is, for God's sake!"

Benedict describes Hollywood today as a hotbed of hype. "They can sell
Spam--it's like selling cars and shoes. This is a town that's built on
that, that's why it's so tantalizing to people all over the world because
they know they could be a TV star. And you know what? They're right. If
you've got a good publicist, you don't even have to to have a personality,"
he charges.

"It's the microwave stars. Faster, faster. Wood-burning wasn't fast enough,
gas and electricity aren't fast enough. Man, we've got microwave movie
stars! Bang--it's Flashdance! Bang--Footloose! Voom! Instead of
a marriage between America and a Humphrey Bogart or a Clark
Gable, it's one-night stands, one after the other. God bless
Paul Newman, he may be the last of the old breed of stars."

Forty years ago, Benedict is sure he'd have been under contract to a major
studio and nurtured along. "Now there is no film business. If there's a
film being made it's for Robert Redford, Burt Reynolds, Clint Eastwood,
Richard Gere, maybe John Travolta. But there are no films for a
guy waiting to be discovered."

Although Benedict made his film debut in Georgia, Georgia, a draft-resister
tale written by Maya Angelou, the role of which he's proudest was in the
1974 movie W. Benedict played a psychotic, wife-beating killer, opposite
Twiggy. "They were looking for Al Pacino and in comes this Troy Donahue
type," he says.

Benedict recently finished another of those image-jolting roles in a
British-made horror thriller TV film, Tattoo. He plays a weak gambling
type who kills an occult leader who happens to be a tattooist. During the
struggle, a tattoo starts creeping over his body. The part was a good
stretch, he says, but he doesn't lie awake at night salivating over his
movie prospects.

"I don't want to be another Richard Gere....Well, I couldn't be another
Richard Gere. But I have no desire to become a movie star in that
usual way and just be a hired gun. Let's put it this way, I don't care
if I never make a big Hollywood movie, if I never make my
Butch Cassidy or Superman. I really don't care."

To be continued...
----------------------------
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Old 03-20-2015, 12:45 AM   #2
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DIRK BENEDICT: TV's Reluctant Sex Symbol ~~ continued

..Actually, Benedict did start out on the same footing as Richard Gere. They were both lowly apprentices at the Seattle Repertory Theater and shared stage-sweeping duties.

"We used to say, 'My God, we deserve better than this!' Now he's a great movie star, and here I am in TV. But the truth is that if he and I were to walk down the streets of Boise, Idaho, probably more people would say, 'There goes the Face Man.' Twenty-five million people see me every week on The A-Team, although those who recognized him would most likely say, 'There goes Richard Gere.'"

Benedict really doesn't mind the nickname, though. "I always thought it was silly for Henry Winkler to complain about The Fonz. Mr. T understands it, thank God. Call him Mr. T, Bad Attitude, it's all the same. Who cares? It's all insecurity.

Obviously, being the A-Team's "dumb blond" or "quasi-sauve, poor imitation of Burt Reynolds", as he has cheerfully referred to himself, cannot be exactly what he envisioned when he was studying his craft. Is there a tinge of resentment? A reservation or two?

"I did wrestle with it a bit," he admits, "because it's antithetical in many ways to what I see for myself. But I didn't solicit it. This show came to me from the hand of God."

True, the part was written for him originally, but NBC rejected him point blank. Benedict heard the news while pheasant hunting in Montana, and he distinctly remembers NOT being disappointed. Later, though, NBC had a sudden change of heart.

"All I can say, and it's true, is that the only casting director to ever want me is the one in the sky. Everything I've ever done has been over the dead bodies of the casting people. I'm always being crammed down somebody's throat for some reason," he says.

Despite his initial reservations, Benedict insists: "I'm having one hell of a good time. Even the 14-hour days appeal to my samurai nature. It can be a form of meditation; it's a bit like climbing Mount Everest. I love to spend all those hours on my feet."

The A-Team is Benedict's third series, following Chopper One and Battlestar Galactica, and definitely a novel experience. "The A-Team s the first TV show I've worked on that has a community atmosphere," he says. "It's the first time I've worked with actors who know who the hell they are. So, there's no insecurity, no egomania, no paranoia, no neurosis, no bullshit.

"And a lot of that is probably because we have four individuals who have led interesting lives. T is tremendously philosophical. Dwight is very intelligent--and George has been through it all, and now he's just having the time of his life!"

With a couple more years of "Face Man" under his belt, Benedict could probably retire. He will also probably be able to get a lucrative publishing deal for his "macrobiological autobiography," titled Kamikaze Cowboy. "It's about my prostate, my orgasms---talk about sharing something private!" Clearly, then, success does offer Benedict some opportunities for growth that would otherwise be closed to him.

But there is a price to pay. The trouble with success, says Benedict, is that it can breed insularity, isolation and a sense of exclusivity. And, naturally, this price tag skyrockets for someone with Benedict's love of anonymity. When he's not working, he hides behind a hat and glasses. And he doesn't enjoy signing autographs.

He does love women, however ("I'm an incurable romantic") and claims he had a great time meeting them when he was an unknown. "Once I started to get a little bit of recognition it went to hell. It adulterated it. It put an unnatural element into it."

Benedict says he'd either find himself the target of pushy women he didn't favor, or turning off the women he did like--thanks largely to his glib, somewhat arrogant TV image.

Why doesn't success impress Benedict? Why doesn't he dine daily at Ma Maison and rub shoulders with glittery, smile-for-the-camera stars? Probably it has to do with a profound experience that began almost 10 years ago.

In 1975, Benedict got the news that he had a tumor of the prostate. Without waiting to see if it was benign (unlikely at his age, doctors said), he took unorthodox, unwise and--he now admits--slightly insane action. He packed a duffel bag and a rice bowl and hitchhiked across the country, camping along the roadside at night and following a macrobiotic diet, which included whole grains (oats, barley, buckwheat, rice, rye), cooked vegetables, beans and some seaweeds. No raw foods, salads, fish, fruit or animal foods. In truck stops he made do with oatmeal. "I had a little metal pot I cooked in. I used to pull things out of the fields or steal corn because I ate no flour products of any kind," he says.

"I didn't want to spend all my time defending why I wasn't going to a doctor, and for all I knew some of my family might have tied me up in the middle of the night and hauled me off to a hospital for my own good. As far as my loved ones were concerned, I'd just gone bonkers over this weird diet and was trying to kill myself. I was a write-off in their eyes."

There was, however, method in his madness. A fundamental belief of the macrobiotic lifestyle is that you can cure yourself of anything. So rather than face the surgeon's knife, Benedict declared his own war on the big C.

Two important sources of support for Benedict were Gloria Swanson and her husband, author William Duffy (Sugar Blues), who is now helping Benedict edit Kamikaze Cowboy. Sometime earlier, they had introduced him to macrobiotic expert Michio Kushi, who changed his diet and--Benedict claims--gave him the tools for recovery.

His weight dropped from 180 pounds to 135, his skin turned yellow and there were periods of intense loneliness before Benedict started to get better. Six months passed before the scales crept up to 142 pounds. "My skin changed, my fingernails changed, my body aroma changed, and the sexual experience was different--better, oh yes," he says.

Benedict recalls becoming impatient with other people's complaints of colds and back pains "when all of a sudden, here I was pissing blood."

But there was more. "If you don't cure yourself of acne, so what? If you don't cure yourself of cancer, you die. It's so spiritual really, your faith is always being tested. It was time for me to put up or shut up," he says.

Alone on the road, Benedict began to realize that he could survive with no money, no career and few friends. "I lived through it by my own hand and my own wits, being my own doctor, my own best friend, my own guru. That was really scary, and probably one of the most dangerous experiences anyone can have," he claims. "Forget rafting down rivers, jumping out of airplanes--those are just things people do to make their lives risky."

The cancer experience profoundly affected his spiritual outlook. Says Benedict: "I felt I'd been through the eye of the needle. This realization hit me that an attachment to life is as silly as the fear of death. So it didn't matter if my life ended in a bathtub in New Hampshire in June of 1975. I realized that death, dying, is going to be the most fantastic, ultimate, incredible experience we have. I believe it will be the greatest chuckle when we look back and say, 'Jeez, what I put myself though for nothing.' I think it will be grand, just grand."

To be continued...
----------------------------
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Old 03-20-2015, 12:58 AM   #3
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DIRK BENEDICT: TV's Reluctant Sex Symbol ~~ conclusion

Today, the actor describes his dedication to macrobiotics as purely practical: "It's not gibberish, not religious, not mystical, and not magical. It's like fixing a car. It says, look, if this car's running rough, the trouble's in the carburetor and the fuel mixture is too lean. So let's enrich the fuel mixture."

"You might say macrobiotics can't work or everybody would be doing it. But the truth is, it's too simple for most people to accept."

Because of his emphasis on fundamentals, Benedict says he tries to keep his life basic and as free of possessions and attachments as possible. Nevertheless, despite talk of freedom and self-reliance, this vagabond, this dyed-in-the-wool wanderer, is about to marry. The impregnable loner is actually engaged to Toni Hudson, the 23-year old blond actress who appeared in "Cross Creek", and whom he met while visiting a university in northern California. He was talking to students about careers in acting, she was talking about careers in modeling.

Benedict concedes he was not an easy match. The die was cast early in childhood when he'd spend hours of solitude hunting, fishing and walking in the mountains. He preferred seeing movies alone, too, finding that a companion somehow distracted from and diluted the experience. That feeling rolled over into his relationships.

His views were always crystal clear, he says. Unless a relationship added something to your life, why be in it? "People would look at me like I was sick, as if there was something wrong with me because I was free and clear--I didn't have two or three half-assed relationships going along while I was looking for someone. I always kept it very clean. People settle for arrangements because, heaven forbid, they should sit home alone on a Saturday night. Well, that was not part of my mentality.

"I've been a bachelor my whole life, and I'm comfortable being a bachelor. I never missed having a woman around because whenever I wanted a woman around, for the more fundamental needs of mankind, it was possible."

Mind you, he believes fervently in marriage. "It's the ultimate dream, and any man who doesn't accomplish it in his lifetime is a failure, including Warren Beatty. Anybody can be president of a corporation, but to create a family is really the ultimate art form. Paintings, museums, and God forbid, TV shows, are a meaningless legacy--children are the ultimate."

Benedict envisions an arrangement that includes joint bank accounts, total sharing and distinct male-female roles. He doesn't think marriage partners should be like sexual bunkmates leading separate lives. In pre-Toni days, he'd have said that uncomplaining Oriental women came closest to his ideal.

The media contribute to this material, symptomatic facade of sex, says Benedict. "All those glossies of all those beautiful people with their clothes off have nothing to do with anything of valid importance in terms of the human experience. They've got nothing to do with love, nothing to do with longevity.

"In contemporary America, everyone wants to be 'out there.' Everyone wants to be a movie star! Women say, 'There's no fulfillment in having kids and washing dishes and scrubbing floors and cooking. That's boring and mundane. You do it--I'm going out to have lunch with the boss. I'm going out there and I'm going to have all the excitement of the workaday world.' Well, that's bull---t."

Women today pay a high price for their so-called liberated lifestyles, claims Benedict. "Women in their thirties who've had the single life, had their career, got their own car, got their own apartment, they're despairing. They're saying, 'Why can't I meet a man? Why can't I find a man who'll commit?'

"Well, what the hell for? Why do they deserve that kind of commitment? There's no reason for it, they're never going to have it, any more than a man will get it with another man, because there's no difference. It's very unisexual, and the vibrations are very much the same; the polarity has been decreased."

[At this point, your transcriber grinds her teeth more than a bit at certain comments of Mr. Benedict which she will NOT editorialize on in this forum...mumble mumble mumble...]

As for sex, Benedict believes many women have made themselves a bed they don't really want to lie on.

"You have a one-night stand, a one-week stand, they want to talk about your relationship--why you haven't called, what does it mean?

"They've got it all confused! If they want it that way, fine; but don't try to reverse it and say, no, we *mean* something to each other in some emotional or psychological or, heaven forbid, intellectual or spiritual way. It's nonsense! We're animals mating in the dark, and let's not pretend it's something else."

Of course, there is glaring contradiction in his philosophy. Toni has just finished an as yet untitled film with Sally Field. Why hasn't *his* working woman sacrificed her career?

"Well there's no doubt but that she would. But, you see, it's perfect because it allows me to experience the lesson that there are no rules. There are always surprises. She's a very unique kind of person, and now that she's succeeding, I don't want her to stop. She has fulfilled every dream I ever had about a woman. She takes care of me in a way that's never happened to me before, and she never complains."

Perhaps he never let anyone else get close enough? He admits he has been accused of that. He also admits that the very mention of the dreaded words, 'Let's sit down and talk about our relationship,' have been enough to make him ask for the check in a restaurant before the main course arrived. He hates soap-opera style chewing over relationships.

"Toni makes breakfast for me every morning at six o'clock, which means she had to get up at five. And the way I eat was not part of her life before she met me."

Toni didn't ask a million questions about miso and seaweed, but quickly picked up his cooking methods. By her second trip to Montana, she was the one in the kitchen. Benedict also admits she was the one to make adjustments, compromises and changes. Whenever he met a woman he told her the same thing. Toni was no exception.

"I said, 'Look, I'm never getting married and I'm never having kids.' In spite of that, she said, 'That's alright, you just tell me when it's over.' And it worked. All that giving paid off.

"This may sound melodramatic, but I believe men should be willing, in the classical tradition, to lay down their life for that woman, that family, that commitment."

Old-fashioned romantic or rip-roaring chauvinist? Well, that's a matter of opinion. But how has this notoriously roving eye taken to staying focused on one-woman? At the beginning of the year, he had said: "I've never been married for reasons similar to why I don't like doing a TV series. A film is like a one-night stand, and a TV series is like a marriage---it goes on and on and on."

Well, we know about the TV series. Doesn't marriage compromise a man whose idea of a long patch of monogamy used to be a couple of days, or maybe a couple of weeks? Giving up the women and the sex is not, Benedict answers, much of a compromise.

"I don't meet many women who would really be attractive to me sexually, even in terms of being curious about the experience. I find most women in Los Angeles, and in cities, rather garish--all that makeup, the designer costumes, the attitudes. They're like female impersonators. You want to scrape away and try to find what's underneath.

"They get themselves all painted up, and it's like a circus or like they're streetwalkers. It's all so blatant, so contrived, so planned.

"Sheer physicality. Fast-food sex. When you're hungry, eat. When you're horny, screw. Without any concern for all the infinite number of other elements that are involved."

Opinionated? Yes. Controversial? Certainly. Uncompromising and irritating, but also honest and disciplined. The contradictory adjectives are all accurate. Benedict eludes neat stereotyping. He is the perfect face who feels inner spirit is more important, a series star at odds with the medium of TV, a confirmed bachelor on the threshold of marriage. Is the actor reshaping his values to fit the hands life deals him? Probably not. More likely it's the lesson of the kamikaze cowboy--the lesson, as Benedict says, that there are no rules.

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Old 03-20-2015, 06:53 AM   #4
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Hey ojai22! Thanks for taking the time to transcribe the article! I thought it was a really interesting read. I particularly liked your comments regarding the grinding of teeth. I was feeling a tad challenged myself, around that point.
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Old 03-20-2015, 01:27 PM   #5
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Hey ojai22! Thanks for taking the time to transcribe the article! I thought it was a really interesting read. I particularly liked your comments regarding the grinding of teeth. I was feeling a tad challenged myself, around that point.

Hi Antimony. I think there's been a misunderstanding. I found this article that was published in Playgirl Magazine in 1984 on the internet in three parts. Had to track down all the parts! The interviewer/author was the one grinding her teeth. I only posted it here at DBC.

Glad you liked it, so did I.

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Old 03-20-2015, 03:56 PM   #6
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Excellent interview, and a great find, ojai. Thanks!
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Old 03-20-2015, 04:29 PM   #7
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Hey ojai22! Thanks for taking the time to transcribe the article! I thought it was a really interesting read. I particularly liked your comments regarding the grinding of teeth. I was feeling a tad challenged myself, around that point.

Antimony, it finally occurred to me that the interviewer should have done the tooth-grinding when he said it, not later as she was transcribing, apparently from a tape recorder. Why didn't she catch it when he said it - she was right there in the room with him --- --- or was that the problem?


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Old 03-21-2015, 02:36 AM   #8
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Hi Antimony. I think there's been a misunderstanding. I found this article that was published in Playgirl Magazine in 1984 on the internet in three parts. Had to track down all the parts! The interviewer/author was the one grinding her teeth. I only posted it here at DBC.

Glad you liked it, so did I.

Whoops! My mistake! I did a quick google for the article and only found the cover pic, so wrongly assumed you'd a copy of the mag and typed it out. Like I said it was a quick google, although if it was in three parts maybe it was hard to find. PS I like the fact that you're honest, you could easily have taken credit for it and no one would have known!
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Old 03-21-2015, 02:58 AM   #9
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Antimony, it finally occurred to me that the interviewer should have done the tooth-grinding when he said it, not later as she was transcribing, apparently from a tape recorder. Why didn't she catch it when he said it - she was right there in the room with him --- --- or was that the problem?


Yip that was probably it.

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Old 03-21-2015, 07:48 AM   #10
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Is the transcription censored or am I lost in translation? Edit: I got lost in translation.

Anyway, an interview is an interview. Journalists make questions and get their answers, so all that teeth grinding is a little out of place. It's his opinion after all.
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Old 03-22-2015, 07:00 AM   #11
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Is the transcription censored or am I lost in translation? Edit: I got lost in translation.

Anyway, an interview is an interview. Journalists make questions and get their answers, so all that teeth grinding is a little out of place. It's his opinion after all.
Lost in Translation - great movie! And yes off-topic.
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Old 03-23-2015, 09:59 PM   #12
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OK - moved to the Main Discussion forum.
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Old 03-24-2015, 07:27 AM   #13
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Thanks John, and apologies, didn't mean for you to go to the trouble of moving the thread.
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Old 03-24-2015, 12:45 PM   #14
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Thanks John, and apologies, didn't mean for you to go to the trouble of moving the thread.
Oh, no, Antimony, it wasn't your fault, it was mine. I was posting some of Dirk's writing from his old official site into The Books section. Then when I found some interviews - articles NOT written by him - I just continued to post them in the same section. When I realized my mistake, I asked John to move them. So, no worries ~~ you're blameless.....
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Old 03-25-2015, 03:29 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by ojai22 View Post
Oh, no, Antimony, it wasn't your fault, it was mine. I was posting some of Dirk's writing from his old official site into The Books section. Then when I found some interviews - articles NOT written by him - I just continued to post them in the same section. When I realized my mistake, I asked John to move them. So, no worries ~~ you're blameless.....
Blameless, I like it, can't say I'm often called that, but I'll take it. Thanks for the explanation; I had thought John was responding to my comment about the movie being off-topic . I have to confess I've got a serious case of "OMG isn't DB amazing!" at the moment, although somehow given my present location in cyberspace I doubt I am alone in that, and so I've really been enjoying reading all the articles, you and others have been posting. Thanks
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Old 10-25-2017, 07:24 PM   #16
Vballspieler
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Default Re: DIRK BENEDICT: TV's Reluctant Sex Symbol

an article discussed a while ago....
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Old 10-26-2017, 10:16 PM   #17
Ludlum'sDaughter14
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Default Re: DIRK BENEDICT: TV's Reluctant Sex Symbol

I have thoughts. Shall I speak them?

*crickets*

Hearing no objections...

I love this interview. Despite the interviewer's teeth-grinding, it really is Dirk uncensored (except for by himself - note the truncated accounts of some topics he covers in his books). He says some things here that he says other places, but here he goes into a lot more detail.

The common thread throughout this interview, from the interviewer's perspective, seems to be how Dirk defies the mold of Hollywood stars and even popular thinking. But if you look at the subjects discussed, you can uncover the "why." His nonchalance toward fame and success, his condemnation of a culture that both idolizes and cheapens sex, and his embracing of all his life experiences, positive and negative, go back to the view he has of the nature of life and death. He is profoundly aware of a reality that can't be seen, and it radically rewrites his every paradigm.

This is the characteristic that I respected so much in Dirk from the beginning. When I read his books, this is what had me shouting inside my head, "Finally! Someone else who gets it!" Out of all the people I've known in my brief life, I'd say several understand that fame is not really as positive as it's presented; fewer understand that sex, one of the greatest (if not the greatest) physical pleasures known to humanity, is not as essential to a satisfactory existence as our culture would have us believe. Even fewer understand how to view the "negative" experiences of life as not simply something to be endured, but an essential part of a full life of personal development and real achievement. Many of the people who acknowledge this theoretically still forget to apply the perspective practically; when they find themselves in anything from daily frustrations to a major crisis, they crumple, freak out, despair, or enter fight-flight-or-freeze mode. It takes a unique perspective to be able to stand in the middle of the shifting sands of fortune and recognize the hand of fate beneath.

It's not always appropriate for me to verbalize this perspective when trying to comfort and encourage others in their difficulties. And when it is appropriate, I have to be careful. I have to make it clear that I'm not diminishing the problem or the other person's suffering in any way - I've had too much experience of my own to do that. But what has buoyed me up through the recent difficulties (very legitimate ones) in my life is knowing that there is a purpose behind it all, and after life the reward will be worth it. The first part was pounded into me during the constant pushing through physical struggles last year, and the second part grew into my consciousness at the beginning of this semester, just in time to set me up for spending two weeks attending college classes with a very stuck kidney stone.

My experience being kidney stoned was different than it would have been a year or two ago. The people around me were a lot more concerned and distressed by the whole incident than I was. Granted, the pain meds I was on may have helped... but even when I was in excruciating pain, I still didn't get worried about passing the kidney stone until it had been over a week and school was getting harder to keep up with. I knew that (1) there was at least one very good reason I had a kidney stone, even if I didn't know what that reason was, (2) I would learn from the experience, and (3) it would last just as long as it needed to for me to benefit from it. And you know what? Just about three weeks later, I have already seen how all of those truths are playing out in my life.

This post wasn't originally planned to go quite this direction. Actually, I'd been thinking about including a testimonial/rant about how a normal and healthy adult with a working sex drive could still live without needing sex to be content. But at the moment I'm too sleepy to responsibly open that can of worms... So I'll just sum up. The reason Dirk has such a radical perspective on what is important and what is not, what is vital and what is not, and how tragedy and trauma can integrate fully with a "good life," is because he knows the pebble creates a thousand ripples, and those ripples eventually reach the horizon of what mortal eyes can see, and then they touch the shore where all of it makes sense. This is the truth that has governed my understanding of the world more and more ever since I was a child. It makes life that much more worth living.
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Old 10-27-2017, 12:15 AM   #18
LittleMonkeyDog
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Default Re: DIRK BENEDICT: TV's Reluctant Sex Symbol

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludlum'sDaughter14 View Post
I
This is the characteristic that I respected so much in Dirk from the beginning. When I read his books, this is what had me shouting inside my head, "Finally! Someone else who gets it!" Out of all the people I've known in my brief life, I'd say several understand that fame is not really as positive as it's presented; fewer understand that sex, one of the greatest (if not the greatest) physical pleasures known to humanity, is not as essential to a satisfactory existence as our culture would have us believe. Even fewer understand how to view the "negative" experiences of life as not simply something to be endured, but an essential part of a full life of personal development and real achievement. Many of the people who acknowledge this theoretically still forget to apply the perspective practically; when they find themselves in anything from daily frustrations to a major crisis, they crumple, freak out, despair, or enter fight-flight-or-freeze mode. It takes a unique perspective to be able to stand in the middle of the shifting sands of fortune and recognize the hand of fate beneath.
You've said it beautifully. Wow!

This is why I admire and respect Dirk and why I just love his books (and keep re-reading them). I was super glad that someone had the same thoughts about life. And yes, not everybody 'gets' it.
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